The Saga Continues

WordPress

WordPress was borne of initial idea seeding via B2 (Cafelog) in 2001, which was launched by Michael Valdrighi. In 2003, cofounders Matt Mullenweg and Mike Little forked B2 and created WordPress, an Open Source blogging and now content management system estimated to power the largest number of websites of any individual product (20%). Through the largest thriving community of any website management system, WordPress has grown to include theme designers, plugin developers, webmasters and site developers. With the power of participants, WP now can power anything from small individual blogs to large multi-user social communities to business websites. Core contributing developers include Ryan Boren, Mark Jaquith, Matt Mullenweg, Andrew Ozz, Peter Westwood and Andrew Nacin. WordPress has just recently celebrated its 10 year anniversary.

WPCommunity

WPCommunity.com was started as an extension of Web Developer Tom Ford who found WordPress in the early days looking for a solution to power a group of large websites that had outgrown their flat HTML infrastructure. Needing more features, WordPress was chosen based on another user who was kind enough to put together a comparison chart of several platforms, with detailed information. The way this individual was able to present this side by side comparison using WordPress ultimately led to giving it a shot...which led to massive experimentation to the different things it could do. The heavy and growing demand for assistance led to offering such, bringing us to today. Tom Ford has contributed to various other development agencies including TC Websites, WPMU.org and WPML. (as well as solving countless technical issues and working through many full website builds).

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    • RECENT WORDPRESS NEWS ON THE WEB
        • AUG 29, 2014
          WPTAVERN: GOOGLE AUTHORSHIP IS OFFICIALLY DEAD, WORDPRESS AUTHORSHIP PLUGINS ...

          John Mueller, Webmaster Trends Analyst at Google, announced today that Google will be discontinuing its support for authorship in search results.

          We’ve gotten lots of useful feedback from all kinds of webmasters and users, and we’ve tweaked, updated, and honed recognition and displaying of authorship information. Unfortunately, we’ve also observed that this information isn’t as useful to our users as we’d hoped, and can even distract from those results. With this in mind, we’ve made the difficult decision to stop showing authorship in search results.

          In June 2014, author photos were dropped from search results in order to reduce clutter in the design, according to Mueller. Today’s announcement means that the rel=author markup will no longer be tracked on websites.

          Google authorship in actionGoogle authorship in action

          Authorship was an experiment that Google had been running for the past three years. Mueller reported that their tests showed that removing authorship generally does not seem to reduce traffic to sites, nor does it make it more likely that users will click on ads. The change was allegedly implemented to improve users’ experience.

          Although the authorship schema is no longer used to identify a post’s author in search results, Mueller says there’s no need to be in a rush to remove it from your code. “We’re no longer using it for authorship, we treat it like any other markup on your pages. Leaving it is fine, it won’t cause problems (and perhaps your users appreciate being able to find out more about you through your profile too),” he said.

          Jetpack 2.5 introduced an easy way for WordPress users to add authorship to posts. Representatives from the Jetpack team were not immediately available to comment on whether or not the plugin will shed the dead weight of authorship in the next release. There are many other WordPress plugins that add Google authorship, though not as elegantly as Jetpack did. Several major SEO plugins also incorporate ways to add authorship to posts. The authorship-related functionality in these plugins is now obsolete.

          Mueller emphasized that even though authorship is being discontinued, Google will continue its support for structured markup:

          Going forward, we’re strongly committed to continuing and expanding our support of structured markup (such as schema.org). This markup helps all search engines better understand the content and context of pages on the web, and we’ll continue to use it to show rich snippets in search results.

          Many SEO specialists have speculated that linking authorship to Google+ profiles was a ploy to get more people to use Google+, a product that has failed to gain momentum. Fans of the authorship feature are baffled by its removal, given that Google’s research indicates that it doesn’t seem to affect search results. From a user’s standpoint, seeing an author you recognize can be tremendously beneficial when selecting among similar search results.

          Google is well known for experimenting with features and products and killing them off as soon as tests show that they are no longer valuable. It’s not clear whether or not authorship will be reincarnated in some other form down the road. If you’re using a WordPress plugin that adds authorship to your site for SEO purposes, you are safe to disable it, as Google is no longer interested in that data.

          AUG 28, 2014
          WPTAVERN: PROWORDPRESS SUBREDDIT PASSES 1,000 SUBSCRIBERS

          reddit

          Earlier this year we featured the /r/ProWordPress subreddit on a post exploring various WordPress watering holes. If you’re not familiar with subreddits, they are essentially focused topics where where registered users can vote article submissions “up” or “down.” Subscribing to a subreddit allows you to hone in on specific topics where you have an interest.

          /r/ProWordPress was started by Brad Williams, CEO of WebDevStudios and author of Professional WordPress Plugin Development. As a developer, Williams has a strong interest in exploring more technical topics surrounding WordPress. The group recently passed 1,000 subscribers (currently at 1,027 readers) and continues to grow.

          prowordpress-subreddit

          “I started the r/ProWordPress subreddit to focus on more advanced WordPress topics,” Williams told the Tavern. “r/WordPress is great but will always have more beginner users, so it’s hard for the more advanced topics to surface. r/ProWordPress is a smaller, more focused subreddit with a focus on advanced WP topics.

          As the subreddit has grown, r/ProWordPress has become one of William’s main sources of news on WordPress development. More subscribers translates into a wider reach of advanced topics as well as more voting users to curate the quality of articles that float to the top. Williams has the ability to moderate the topics submitted but reports that, unless you have a highly active subreddit, very little work is required.

          With WordPress now powering more than 23% of all websites online, the community surrounding the software is growing at breakneck speed. People are working with WordPress every day, building businesses on top of it, and are seeking out places online to learn from each other. Matt Mullenweg recently jumped in on the Advanced WordPress group on Facebook, which has accrued more than 9,000 members. This group explores a wide range of WordPress-related topics but may not appeal to everyone.

          While some WordPress users enjoy interacting on Facebook, others are taking to forums such as WP Chat. Different kinds of groups are popping up, reflecting the various interaction styles that WordPress community members use to connect.

          “WordPress has such a large user base that it’s hard to have a one size fits all area for all topics,” Williams said. In his corner of the internet, he hopes that /r/ProWordPress will continue to be a nice place to share and read about more advanced topics. In some ways Reddit combines the best aspects of both Twitter and forums, in that you can share articles, vote, and comment to enter into discussions with other members. If advanced WordPress development falls within your wheelhouse, make sure to drop by the /r/ProWordPress subreddit and subscribe to new topics.